AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994).

When in doubt, call in professionals to do your maintenance check, or call Jerry for an unbiased professional assessment 248.224.0258.

The Do First Schedule (back to main menu)

  Initial maintenance and safety Item Menu:

- Always remember: "Safety first, safety always" -  

  Protect yourself around the home. (it takes more than common sense!):

Do first Schedule) - GENERAL INDEX (return to menu) - includes damage, injury, pollution prevention, and mitigation from:  trips / slips / falls / cuts / breaks / punctures / blows / strangulation / drowning / electrocution / poisoning / burns / bites / property damage and flooding in places or from attic / crawlspace / roof /  doors / walls / windows / floors / electrical system components / plumbing system components / HVAC system components / driveways / garages / stairs / decks and porches / walkways / vegetation / climbing and other equipment / vermin / chemicals, cleansers, bio-hazards /

Do first Schedule) 

- Prevent hazards and injuries: 

General - Install & maintain emergency and safety equipment: communication system / emergency rescue / emergency access / emergency egress / safety equipment, (fire extinguishers, first aid kits, child safety components) 

General - Prepare, plan and implement: make and test safety plans /  safety plans and procedures:  tetanus inoculations / fire plans and drills / other emergency planning 

Safety Equipment: Do first - Initially - always -

Maintain an up to date first aid kit and fire extinguishers, and place an identifying placard on the wall above where each is located. Keep fire extinguishers away from fire source yet conveniently nearby. Locate units at the top or bottom of stairways and stair wells for easy access. Install the extinguishers and first aid kits high enough away from small children.  Everyone old enough to use the extinguisher and first aid kit should be trained in their use.  Annually check that the extinguisher is fully charged and ready for use, (arrow on gauge pointing into the green zone. About 1 in every 200 homes I inspect show signs of a past fire!

Install, maintain and update smoke, radon, and carbon monoxide detectors.  Carbon-monoxide detectors are needed anytime when burning any fuel such as wood, gas, propane, etc.  Install a carbon-monoxide detectors and smoke detectors on each floor of the building following the manufacturer's instructions. Label the expiration date on each carbon monoxide detectors as 5 years from installation date, and 10 years on each smoke detector. Replace the units at the end of these expected service lives. Test each monthly.  Smoke detectors should also be in each bedroom along with another one directly outside the bedroom area. Test and replace any batteries as needed.  Develop an escape and emergency plan for every occupant.  

Obtain and wear protective clothing, mask and goggles when working around the house, such as when going into an attic or crawlspace, or climbing ladders and cutting lawns. Breathing the air in the attic or crawlspace can be dangerous because of the possibility of mold, dust particles and other pollutants found in such environments.  An EPA rated N-95 mask is typically recommended. If there exists the possibility of asbestos, leaking gases, sewage gases, etc. take necessary precautions and/or consult with the experts before entering.  

Install and maintain a filter in the furnace. Filters protect the home from debris from going through the furnace, igniting and blowing into the home.

Install locks and alarms to prevent and warn of access by young children. This includes cabinet door, drawers, toilet seats, door knobs, (use adult grasps), faucets, (use faucet grasp), locks, etc.  Relocate poisons, such as cleaners and other chemicals, up and away from access by children, and away from and never above food stuffs. Likewise move unsafe tools, utensils, etc. out of reach. lock doors, etc.  Lock doors and install alarms to utility rooms, sump pits, pool areas, etc to keep the kids out and let you know of any breaches. Hide keys out of reach of young children. 

Install child proof stairway gate for young children at the tops and bottom of all stair runs and keep in good repair. 

Safety Equipment continued: Do first - Initially - always -

Remove window crank handles from windows in a small child's play or sleep room where a child could fall out of the window after opening, or install a protective barrier. Window cranks are needed for larger children to escape in the event of a fire when the room door is not a viable exit. Practice fire escape procedures with your children along with designating a location to meet.

Install sliding locks atop bi-fold doors to prevent small children entry and the pinching of fingers in bi-fold doors.

Install a self shutting door between the garage and the home to help prevent child entry and play around or behind vehicles. Doors should not slam shut quickly nor pinch fingers.

 

Prevent access to pools, tubs and other containers and areas to prevent drowning and other injuries, lock entry doors and gates to pool and tub areas, cover pools, tubs and hot tubs, sump pits, etc., raise locks to 5" of higher.  Keep power controls out of the reach of small children. The hot tub and pool need child proof locks and covers. The height of the garage door opener control button/switch and gate locks to swimming pool/hot tub areas need to be at least 5 feet above the walking or climbing surfaces.  Pool gates and doors should self close and lock. Pool fences need to typically be 4 feet high or higher. Lock doors to sump pump pit or install a lock down lid. Empty any open large pails. (small children are top heavy). 

Install safety glass wherever a person could step or fall  into, or put an arm through glass.

To prevent falls on stairways and porch decks, follow current building code rail height of 36 inches on porches and decks over 30 inch high and install balusters or walls beside stair treads.

 

Prevent small children and others from falling over rails and patio benches, window sills, etc. Install rails with less than 4 inch spacing between spindles, posts, etc. Do not allow rails or spindles that create a ladder that children can climb up and fall over the top rail.  Railings need to be a minimum of 36 inch high or higher per local building code requirements. Railings at high rise buildings need to be 48 inches high for occupant safety. Patio rail seating needs a tall back to prevent standing children and occupants from falling over.

 

Install rails and guards in front of low sills of open windows wherever a person could fall out or over. First and second story balcony rails need to be at least 36 inches high. Higher stories require 42 inch high rails. Windows and other barriers should probably be protected to these heights also.

Install full length and properly sized handrails on stairways that are sized for small hands, and also for the elderly.  Protect everyone. 

Install a wide non-slip steps to access higher surfaces such as sinks and cabinets. 

Install a tread nose on all stair treads with solid risers. The nose should overhang the tread below by 1". Stair treads with risers but without 1" noses tend to cause stumbling.

Install grab bars in bath and showers for the young, the old and anyone who could slip or fall.

Install higher (ADA) toilets for the elderly with securely mounted grab bars. (ADA = American Disability Act)

 

 

 

Safety Procedures:  Do first - Initially - always - 

Keep your tetanus shot protection current to help prevent lock jaw infections from cuts.   

Obtain and wear protective clothing, mask and goggles when working around the house, such as when going into an attic or crawlspace, or climbing ladders and cutting lawns.  Breathing the air in the attic or crawlspace can be dangerous because of the possibility of mold, dust particles and other pollutants found in such environments.  An EPA rated N-95 mask is typically recommended.  If there exists the possibility of asbestos, leaking gases, sewage gases, etc. take necessary precautions and/or consult with the experts before entering.  

Have a buddy standing by watching or helping you in unsafe conditions, such as using tools or going into a crawlspace, on a roof, or in an attic.  The buddy should be equipped and know what to do in an emergency.

Knock before entering attics, crawlspaces and other seldom entered areas such as doors to seldom used fireplaces:  Knock and make noise before you enter the enclosed area. This will allow vermin enough time to escape or hide. Turn on sufficient and multiple lights to not only to see, but to persuade vermin, such as black widow and brown recluse spiders, (found throughout the 48 lower states), to hide or exit the area instead of lurking in a shadow. (Go directly to the hospital if you receive a spider bite especially from a recluse, a.k.a. fiddle or violin spider. These spiders can also be found in stored bags and clothing. They have very painful and dangerous bites that deform and can kill.)

Don't step into water or moisture in the basement or crawlspace as you could be electrocuted. If  the conditions are thought unsafe, test for electrical current or do like the firemen, shut "off" the electricity to the entire property before entering.

Don't step onto wet, slick, iced roofs, walls, floors, etc.

Always look and inspect the area you plan to walk, stand, step or climb onto for secure footing and safety. Don't fall through the ceiling or into a hidden pit under the crawlspace moisture barrier. Look up for electrical and other hazards from above. Though there are no formal measurements for tripping hazards, governments believe a 1.5 inch high difference in a walking surface constitutes a hazard. I trip regularly on a 1/4 height difference. Trip and fall injuries can be serious and fatal. Talk to dentists, interns and plastic surgeons.

Follow ladder safety when climbing. Watch for the possibility of electrocution from exposed electrical service cables. Don't lean the ladder against a flimsy gutter or flimsy siding as the surface will flex, get damaged, and the ladder will shift and possibly fall.  Don't step on the top rungs of the ladder especially when climbing into the attic.  The ladder should extend two to three rungs above the surface you will be climbing onto. The ladder should be secured to the building. When on a ladder, keep one hand on the ladder at all times. only one extremity can be free of the ladder at any time. No jumping the ladder around like in the movie Animal House

Safety Procedures continued:  Do first - general safety - Initially - always -  

Only one person at a time on a ladder. They must wear non-slip soled shoes with heels so that their foot does not slide off through a rung or down off the roof. Remember, it is easier to climb up than to climb down. Do not lean against any chimney or other components on a roof, as they may fall. Don't touch electrical or communication components and wiring attached to the house for fear of electrocution.

Determine that the area you are climbing onto is structurally safe. The bottom edges of roofs near the fascia and gutters rot, especially on the North side where moisture typically condenses and rots the wood sheathing from inside the attic. Try to walk up the roof stepping on the roof area directly above the supporting roof rafters or trusses for added support. Walk across the roof at only near the top front side (street side, or lake side), of the roof as hidden attic vent holes which are missing their roof vent could cause you to fall. (Its a good idea to look in the attic before climbing the roof to determine if the conditions appear safe). 

Do not climb onto weak, damaged, slick or loose or brittle roof coverings such as clay tile, wood shakes and shingles, slate, metal, etc. that  will be damaged by walking. These materials also break away and could cause someone to fall.  To further prevent falls or possible roof damage, do not climb onto or walk on wet,  frozen, moss covered or otherwise slick roof surfaces. Never step on a roof ridge, ie. the roof peaks, or in the roof valleys between adjoining roof planes, as you may damage the roof surface and cause (hidden) water leaks. Likewise, dry, old, brittle, cupped or cracked shingles will be further damaged if walked on.  Never walk backwards on a roof, no matter how large or aggressive the raccoon may be. Don't step on their poop or on fallen tree limbs, sticks or branches as all will roll like ball bearings and cause you to fall.

Do not touch or breath anything that could remotely hurt you, i.e. bleach, ammonia, electrical components, mold, rot, dead or alive vermin, water, sharp broken objects, etc.  Common household pollutants that should not be touched include lead, asbestos, mold, rodent and roach droppings, etc. 

Don't allow water or moisture to persist anywhere in the home.  Water and moisture can grow mold in 48 hours. Dry the areas quickly and thoroughly.  Remove and dry furniture and carpeting. Use adequate ventilation and obtain professional help if needed. constantly wet wood attracts carpenter ants and termites. Other vermin may also seek water.

Safety Procedures continued:  Do first - general safety - Initially - always -  

Place furniture so as not to impede escape from a house fire through the bedroom windows or other fire egress routes. Many window sills are too high off the floor for some children to open and climb out in an emergency, so give them strong climbable furniture, and teach them how.  Other times, furniture arrangements may obstruct and prevent escape. All bedrooms need a second fire egress method that leads out of the home via another area - other than an adjoining room, hall or same exit. The second bedroom egress is usually a large window with a fully opening sash. Attached storm windows must open easily from inside. Current building code requires at a minimum the opening sash be at least 21 inches wide and at least 24 inches high, and has a clear opening of 5.0 square feet on first floor and 5.7 square feet on all other floors.  Basements also require a properly sized pit with all required safety measures such as ladders and protective grates be installed.

Test open and operate any bedroom fire egress security bar systems attached to windows. These security bars need to open easily from within the room and must not need a key or tool to open in the event of an emergency.  Teach the occupants how to escape through the fire egress window.  Some homeowners install roll down escape ladders on upper floor fire egress windows.

Replace or move any light fixture away from closet shelves and other storage spaces. Combustible items cannot be stored safely within 18 inches of a bare light bulb, 12 inches from a light globe, or within 6 inches of a florescent light fixture per most building codes.

Protect everyone from electrocution or tripping on wires by installing electrical receptacle safety covers, and never placing wires under rugs and carpets, etc.  Secure wires out of reach and out of harms way.  

To prevent strangulation on balustrades, rail spindles or by window cord or drape, follow current building code rail spindle spacing of less than 4".  Do not allow horizontal rail spindles as children can climb these as a ladder and fall over the top rail. Remove or shorten window blind cords, loose wires and cords, plastic bags, etc.

Prevent small children from falling against hard edges such as fireplace hearth brickwork, cantilevered counter tops, bath tub faucets and controls, wall corners, etc. Remove tripping hazards and install padded bumpers along edges, especially on hard table corners.

Prevent Occupants from falling down stairways due to uneven height, damaged stair threads, spreading apart stairway stringers, missing or damaged stair tread noses, too short of depth of stair tread, too tight of tread on spiral staircase, loose or missing handrails, etc. 

Protect children and others from hot surfaces and hot items, such as radiators, stoves, pan handles overhanging stoves, ovens, wall heaters, etc. Keep such items covered or kept away. Do not allow children to be beside anyone cooking.  

Avoid creating a "hot" water scalding hazard at the plumbing faucets. Set water heating temperature between 110 degrees F and 125 degrees.  The lower the temperature the better when it comes to preventing scalding. Scalding can still occur at these lower temperature setting, as super heated water can become temporarily stratified in the water tank and pushed to the spigots.  Skin can scald in 3 seconds at 140 degrees F. Monitor the water for cause bacterial growth in the water tank  when

Safety Procedures continued:  Do first - general safety - Initially - always -  

To prevent lead paint poisoning, remove any chipped paint especially in pre-1978 vintage homes. (note that old, left over lead paint could still be used to paint after 1978.)  Lead paint tastes sweet to children so children will eat paint chips. No paint is edible. Do not sand paper or otherwise abrade older paint finishes as lead can become pulverized and contaminate the entire home. this is also true of rubbing surfaces such as painted window sashes and door jambs.  Lead dust will be breathed in or as dust, get in food and on children's hands and thereby ingested. Remove all poisons from the reach of small children and keep an emergency phone number list available by the telephone. The three most common sources of lead within the home besides plastic and painted toys and dishwares are 1. non-intact paint exposing a layer of lead paint and lead dust, 2. one or more lead painted doors or windows continuing to rub against another surface and creating chips and dust, and 3. visible lead paint chips and debris. The soil beside an older home may also contain lead from paint scrapping and from auto emissions and auto servicing and repairs. The pre 1999 horizontal plastic mini blinds also are known to contain lead which becomes dust.

Install barriers so children and others cannot fall out a window or down a stairway from tripping, playing or wrestling on the floor, and climbing the furniture or other surfaces including beds and bunk beds.

Be certain that children cannot reach the garage overhead door control button. The button is required to be 5 feet above any surface that young children can occupy.

Test operate the safety reverse feature of the powered garage door opener monthly. 

Be certain that children cannot disconnect the garage door from the power door traveler / opener arm. A uncontrolled overhead door is exceptionally heavy and can easily kill and crush persons and pets when falling. Test the tension of the door spring system monthly when the door is down, disconnect the door from the traveler arm and manually lift the door halfway. If you were to let go, the door should stay up halfway. If the door wants to fall or is too heavy to lift, the springs need professional adjustment. Also test the opener safety reverse function also. Follow the manufacturer's instructions.

Remove any protruding screws, nails or other puncture, cut or tear hazards  in and outside the home, such as in the heating system ductwork beneath the floor registers, in the wood or concrete structure, or any where else.

Dull / round any sharp edges and secure loose materials such as improperly finished laminate counter tops, loose laminates, edge material, etc., or install protective edge and corner guards. 

(When in doubt, call in the professionals to do your maintenance check. Or call Jerry for an unbiased professional assessment 248.224.0258.  Condominum & cooperative association maintenance plan services and consultations available).    

AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994)

At your inspection, your AwfullyPicky.com home inspector discloses and documents maintenance which requires your attention. Maintenance always costs time and money.  We feel you need to know about it when buying or selling a home.

repair or remove any sharp cutting edges. Broken mirrors, wall and floor tiles, cracked glass, cracked or broken plumbing fixtures, rusted metal edges, etc. all pose a laceration risk to occupants. Is your and your family tetanus shots up to date?

Secure any loose fireplace doors, sliding floor rugs, carpets, etc.

Install laundry chute closure spring to keep the chute door closed, and constrict the chute opening to prevent small child from falling through or getting trapped. These springs also help prevent the spread of fire.

Protect any gas, water or electrical piping or wiring such as furnace wiring, loose water piping, electrical service cables within reach of a porch or deck, etc. that may be physically struck with sharp hard tools, etc. caught or pulled by children.  Do not store anything, such as rakes, shovels, brooms, etc. behind the electric circuit wiring in the garage or basement walls as contact can break, loosen and weaken electrical connections and damage components which leads to fires from arcing and over heating.

To prevent flooding the floors, and rooms, basement, and crawlspaces below,  install lavatories, (i.e. sinks), with overflow drains. Caulk the bottom of baseboards, cabinets, or other surfaces to keep contain moderate amounts of spilled water on the floor for localized clean up. Likewise, do not allow large water volumes from pet water dishes and children toys and buckets from spilling.  All plant/flower pots need water trays beneath them if not water tight. Toilet leaks are a main cause of  flooding. Stay long enough to be assured the toilet is not going to overflow. Install backup sump pump if primary pump's failure will cause basement flooding. Test both pumps monthly. Install a floor pan to catch and drain any washing machine, water heater, or air conditioner or furnace leaks on upper floors and attic.  Make sure a floor drain is nearby to drain any water. Test the floor drain monthly. Any failure of the drainage system should have a back-up system that causes water to visibly drip so that the home owner knows the system needs immediate repair. 

Install a talking/speaking smoke detector in the child's bedroom as kids sleep through loud noises and regular smoke alarms. Test monthly

Prevent any door from swinging over a stairway where an occupant could be bumped and fall. 

Prevent any door from swinging into a ceiling fan or cabinet door.

Prevent any fan, cabinet, awning, window, etc. from causing head injuries.

Install safety glass or plastic on any window that can be easily run or fallen into and broken. Install protective rail when falling through could be fatal

Secure glued wall mirrors with wall clips to avoid glue failure and falling mirrors.

Safety Procedures continued:  Do first - general safety - Initially - always -  

Bolt top heavy furniture to walls to prevent furniture from falling over if climbed or drawers are left open and fallen on or over loaded.  Secure screws into the wood wall studs for strength.

Shut off natural gas or propane gas supply valves and remove shut off keys where appliances such as stoves and natural gas fireplaces are not in use but remain connected. Mercaptain is the chemical that produces the awful smell the LP or natural gas utility mixes into the fuel so humans can smell any fuel leaks. Call the utility company if anyone can small the odor. Do not switch electrical lights on or off for fear of causing an explosive spark. Call in the emergency. Small leaks can sometimes be closed by gently tightening the pipe fittings.  Other times the old style gas shut off valves are leaking because they or too old and worn-out.  Always know the locations and how to shut off the fuel to the appliances and the fuel to the entire home. If an earthquake or other disaster or accident breaks any fuel pipes evacuate the building and call 911. LP gas is heavier than air and will accumulate in low spots and in basements.

Cap off any gas piping disconnected from appliances as children are notorious at opening gas valves.

Know the location of the electrical serviceperson switch on the side of the furnace, or boiler and air conditioner. The switch can also ,be located on a nearby wall. If this switch is in the "off" position the furnace, boiler, air conditioner, and/or other connected electrical components will not operate. Some cities require this switch to be encased with a cover so children do not shut the system down by mistake.  Electrical power switched to the "off" position will shut down the appliance. Always check this switch first before calling for repair service when the appliance does not turn on and operate from the thermostat controls. Its less embarrassing and less expensive to check this switch first before calling a service repair company.

Create a maintenance log binder/book to keep a record of the major repairs and maintenance activities, as well as any receipts, manuals, warranty paperwork, etc. (homeowners typically store their log binder in the utility area, kitchen or office.)

Monitor for moisture and water entry into the home. after 48 hours of moisture, molds can grow and cause allergic and other health problems.  Some helpful products to control mold after repairing the cause of moisture and water entry:

Concrobuim Mold Control by Siamons International, Inc. www.concrobium.com 

Provide future buyers of your home with peace of mind regarding blemishes. Document home condition blemishes that may affect potential buyers by taking current photographs that show the extent of the blemish at some point in time. This helps buyers observe that the blemishes have not changed or gotten worse.  Instant Polaroid photographs are considered factual of the conditions photographed.  Place yourself in the picture along with a tape measure and/or other items that allow inferring the size and condition of any blemishes photographed. Your image in the photograph allows future homebuyers to determine the age of the photograph.   Document blemishes such as wall cracks, leaks, structural movements, surface damage, etc.

Do first Schedule - STRUCTURAL - (return to menu)   (When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

Safety first, safety always 

Structural Index:

1) Safety

Do first - structural - safety first, safety always - never step into water in the basement or into a moist or wet crawlspace for fear of electrocution. Never touch electrical components while touching any grounded surfaces such as metallic plumbing, steal posts, bare earth or concrete floors in the basement or crawlspace, especially when bare foot, or with hands, knees or other parts of your body.  This is especially true in pre-1965 homes which typically do not have electrical circuit grounding to help open, i.e. kill the power to the circuit, (pop the fuse or trip the circuit breaker to "off or tripped") when touched by a loose and energized wire.

Do first - structural - safety first, safety always - Keep the nearby source of water readily accessible to fire fighters and their equipment. Never allow these fire suppression water sources be they streams, hydrants, lakes or community wells to become neglected, damaged or any other way in capable of operation in the event of an emergency.  Fires and electrical outages should not prevent their use.

Do first - structural - safety first, safety always - Keep any nearby storm sewers clean and open.  Keep any topographical water drainage features functional. Never allow these areas to become over grown or re-contoured in an inappropriate way. Discuss with your neighbors, township and insurers. 

Do first - structural - safety first, safety always - Attics access may require a ladder if a stairway does not exist.  Follow safety rules when climbing a ladder. Always knock first on the access panel or door before opening it so critters can retreat and hide. Do not hit your head or puncture your hands against the protruding roofing nails on the underside of the roof sheathing, (roof nails must protrude by building code). Wear a filter mask to prevent breathing particles. Only step on secure flooring or cross on the ceiling joists or bottom cords of trusses, otherwise you will step through the ceiling below.

 

2) Foundations, including garage and out buildings

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally - Determine if your foundation has any warranty, and is it  transferable. Houses built by some builders have up to ten year transferable warranties. Houses built on pilings or are made of wood foundations may have 30 year warranties, (probably not transferable).  Most foundations are fully settled in two years on sand and gravel, ten years on clay, and never on expansive clays or fine silts. Measure and document all foundation wall and floor cracks and monitor any movement.

Do first - structural - Initially - Determine that the property and the foundation does not flood. discuss with neighbors, the township and the federal government to determine the risk of flooding. Is your home the lowest in the neighborhood, etc. Has the basement floor tile come loose from soaking? Does the bottom of walls, posts, appliances, etc. show high water mark lines, mold or moisture migration? Do foundation wall cracks and rod holes show evidence of significant water leakage such as pooling stains, flow stains to lower areas or to the floor drains?  Does exterior surface water flow toward the foundation? Does the foundation leak at these areas? Take the necessary precautions to protect stored belongings from water, moisture and related mold and mildew damage. outdoor surface water should flow away from the foundation toward some other low point off the property or to a pond, stream, storm drain or other water shed. See slope terrain - 3 items down

Do first - structural - Initially - Determine that the foundation does not move. discuss with neighbors, the township and the federal government to determine the risk of flooding. Is your home the lowest in the neighborhood, etc. Has the basement floor tile come loose from soaking? Does the bottom of walls, posts, appliances, etc. show high water mark lines, mold or moisture migration? Do wall cracks and rod holes leak significant water as evidenced by pooling stains and movement stains to lower floor areas or to floor drains?  

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally - Foundation walls made of concrete block (a.k.a. cinder block) may seasonally develop long horizontal cracks through the mortar joints between the blocks. This movement is usually caused by freezing soil putting pressure on the foundation wall in winter. The crack is usually one to two block heights below the height of the outside soil, i.e. the grade. Hopefully, the wall straightens out in spring.  If the edge of center third of the wall moves out beyond the walls normal surface plane, the wall is considered dangerous and likely to catastrophically fail. Analyze and monitor conditions, and/or obtain professional consultation. You have no peace of mind. Keep the soil from freezing, i.e. slope grade, extend gutter downspouts, install subsoil insulation, etc.

Do first - structural - Initially - as needed - Slope the terrain/grade down and away from the house foundation, 1 inch per foot for the first six feet, and extend all gutter downspouts. To raise the grade beside the home and garage. Protect any face brick or siding from direct contact with the soil.  Moisture closer than 6 inches from untreated lumber may cause rot and invite carpenter ants and termites.  Do not cover small gaps in the exterior with soil as termite or vermin entry can occur.  Caulk shut any small gaps and openings in the foundation and between joints to prevent mouse and insect infestation. Install vermin screens in any open exterior brick veneer weep holes, (found near the brick veneer wall bottom and above openings in brickwork for windows, door, etc. Does exterior water flow toward the foundation areas that show leakage or flooding? Take necessary precaution to protect stored belongings from water, moisture and related mold and mildew situations.

Do first - structural - Initially - Connect your house, mobile home or garage structure to the foundation. Most pre-1990 homes and garages are just sitting on their foundations without any mechanical connections to hold the building on the foundation. An earthquake or high winds can move the building off its foundation. Epoxy bolts through sill plates and strapping walls to both the sill plate and the foundation. P.E.s, (i.e. licensed professional engineers), can assist you through calculation and engineering specifications, or consult with the city building department. Connecting the building to the foundation is especially important in earthquake areas and along the sea shores and high wind areas. Surf the internet for wind and earthquake maps.

    Other approaches may work, but are less reliable and many times frowned upon in this world of specialists. Drill 1/2" diameter holes through the wall plates and 6" down into the concrete foundation. Epoxy large 1/2" bolts with extra large washers beneath the bolt heads into the holes. The washers better spread any lift loads across the sill plates to avoid wood splits and pull through of the bolt. Every six feet is typical. Install rafter and truss hold down metal hangers to tie all rafters and trusses to the wall sill plates.  Use metal strapping to tie the sill plates to the wall studs, and tie the studs to the bottom sill plates. 

   Many mobile and manufactured homes do not have sufficient tie downs or anchors into earth  to avoid shifting and damage in high winds.  Consult with the city building department for their recommendations and requirements.  Also discuss the situation with other specialists to determine the risks involved. Usually a strap every 10 feet along the outside perimeter is considered normal. Flat metal straps have been known to twist and break. Chains and other methods may be superior. Surf the internet and contact manufacturer's for more information.

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally -  Look for signs of structural deformity and movement in foundation and elsewhere, i.e. basement, crawlspace, exterior, interior, attic/roof structure and chimney. Look for anything pulling away or leaning into the building. Look down along any and all straight edges and flat planes of walls, roofs, soffits, frieze boards, foundation walls sides and top, gables ends, gutter lines, etc. to detect and investigate any deformity such as bowing, cupping twisting, cracking, crushing, water staining, etc. Analyze and monitor conditions, and/or obtain professional consultation.

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally - Look for excessive water, erosion, or pressure against the foundation, and other conditions that may cause structural damage such as, trees, moving hill sides, new additions, foundation settling, anything pushing against or away from existing structures and foundations. Any extreme changes in conditions such snow build-up against the foundation, flooding, etc. can cause structural problems. Look at the foundation walls for any signs of moisture build up on either side of the walls.  A failing perimeter drain tile system can result in moisture and/or leakage through the foundation walls. To much water building up behind the walls can lead to foundation wall collapse. Analyze and monitor, and/or obtain professional consultation.

Do first - structural - Initially - as needed - Repair and replace any damaged or rotted sill plates, crushed or rotted beam and joist ends at the foundation. Any moisture can soften wood and allow rot to develop. Additionally, carpenter ants  like wet wood to nest in and termites will eat it.  Soils must be at least 6 inches away from wood or problems can develop from wicking moisture.

Do first - structural - Initially - always - Repair and redirect water from gutter downspouts away from the foundation and foundation posts. Over time, excessive moisture can only do damage to a structure. Get all water away from the building. Follow local ordinances and building code.

3) Walls, Floors, Attic and Roof Structure, including garage and outbuildings

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally - Test all interior and exterior doors and windows to identify any wall movement, both seasonal and permanent. Windows and doors should fit squarely and snuggly into their jambs. Bay windows may sag. Glass should not crack because of pressure from any direction.  Many homes have interior wall and ceiling cracks that open and close seasonally. Extreme changes in these cracks need investigation and possible repair, and may signify foundation problems.

Do first - structural - Initially - as needed - Repair and replace any damaged or rotted wall sill plates, crushed or rotted beam, post and joist ends. Moisture can soften wood and allow rot to develop. Additionally, carpenter ants build their nets in wet wood and termites eat it.  Soils must be at least 6 inches away from wood or problems can develop from wicking moisture.

Do first - structural - Initially - Pre-1960 garage walls typically lack wind bracing. The garage can rack and lean of time. Square up the garage and install cross bracing at each corner, from bottom sill plate diagonally at 45 to 60 degrees up to the top plate(s). Nail brace at each stud crossed intersection. Stud spacing may not exceed 24" per code, but anything is better than nothing. An alternative is to push a sheet of 7/16" 4'x8' OSB, (oriented strand board), or 1/2" exterior plywood into the corners and then heavily nail the sheet to all the studs and plates covered.  

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect rafter roofs, (not trusses), for bow out along the top of the side walls, (wall top plates). This is usually found in older buildings or new additions that utilize rafters. Bowed top plates usually result in a corresponding sag in the roof ridge top line due to lack of tension bracing across the wall top plates.  Cross members tying the wall plates of opposing walls create triangulation and a bottom cord or purlin for the roof rafters.  These cross members then keep the wall tops from bowing out. The nails used to connect such members may pull out of the rafter connections over time. The wall then bows. This is very typical in pre-1960 garages. Look down any and all straight edges and flat planes of walls, roofs, frieze boards, foundation walls, gables ends, gutter lines, etc. to detect and correct any deformity. 

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect floor and ceiling joists, (not trusses), for damage. Wood joists can split, crack, bow and rot. Metal joists also rust. Wood "I" joists can easily be damaged by cutting or notching. Joists cannot be cut without adding additional support. all notches must not exceed what is allowed by building code. Surf the internet to find notching rules per building code. 

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect all roof and floor trusses for damage and deformity. Seek a Professional Engineer's, (PE), help to repair damaged trusses as P Es are the only professional allowed by many state governments to engineer/design such repairs. Many trusses are damaged when initially installed. Wood cords may get cut, chipped or cracked. The nails holding the truss may have damaged the nail plate, i.e. gussets, that hold the truss's cords together. 

    Since wood shrinks more cross dimensionally than in length, look for deformation of the truss where natural wood is used in place of engineered lumber which does not change size much.  Note: the nail pops and joint cracks at the junction of the wall to the ceiling attached to the truss can be caused by the seasonal change in moisture and temperature that causes the bottom cord of the truss to bow and lift. Do not tied down the bottom middle cord of such a truss as you will overload its carrying capacity and failure may ensue. A little seasonal truss lift is generally not a problem.  Remember that the attic is to be as cold as possible in the winter to prevent ice damming and as cool as possible in the summer to prevent shingle overheating.  Attic vents must be kept clean and free of debris to allow venting.   

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect the roof rafter supports in the attics for deformity or stress breakage. Supports should not be attached, (nailed or bolted) to the side of rafters, headers and beams, but should sit squarely under them to afford the best support. The other end of the support should be solidly and squarely attached and standing a top a lower load bearing wall or beam that carries the roof weight loads to the foundation and footer in Earth. In the past, strong backs, (two - 2" by 8" or 10" boards; 8 feet or more in length, edge nailed parallel to each other in a "L" shape), may have been laid across ceiling joists to carry and spread the load across many ceiling joists. The use of strongbacks is no longer allowed since it may result in ceiling cracks and other deformities, and failures. 

To stop rain from falling through upper deck to lower: Rain Escape, www.rainescape.com, or Zip Up Ceiling people, www.zipupceilings.com

4) Retaining and sea walls

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally -  Look for signs of structural deformity and movement in retaining and sea walls. Look for anything pulling away or leaning, or corroding through. Look down along any and all straight edges and flat planes of the wall and its capping material to detect and investigate any deformity such as bowing,  cracking, crushing, or water problems such as poor drainage, washout, etc. Analyze and monitor conditions, and/or obtain professional consultation. Paint, tuck-point, patch, weld, etc. as needed

5) Decks, Porches, Stairs, & Balconies

Do first - structural - Initially - Determine that any deck ledger board supporting a deck is connected to a brick veneer siding of the home is bolted through with a proper connector to span the air gap behind the brickwork. This is rare and most are unsafe.  Also the ledger board needs to be properly flashed to prevent water entry.  However, if the deck is actually supported by cantilevered floor joists supported by a girder/beam near the ledger, then the ledger board connection is not critical. Bolting the ledger to the brick veneer without a proper connector to span the brick air space can deform the brick and cause deck failure.  Seek professional help as needed.

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally - Visually inspect decks, balconies and porches for the main safety warning signs, loose connections or poor workmanship such as wobbly rails and posts; missing or weak connections such poorly attached stairs, or ledger boards nailed to building instead of through bolted; the corrosion on connectors and missing flashing to direct water away from critical areas; Wood rot or severe wood cracking, metal fatigue, rust and corrosion of critical structural components including the girders, beams, and surface decking, and also look for any unacceptable deflection or deformation such as sagging, bending or excessive bouncing.  Reattach any widening or separating stair stringers and repair any damaged stair treads and risers. Add stair tread noses where needed. Obtain the services of a qualified deck professional or Professional Engineer if there is any doubts.

Do first - structural - Initially - seasonally - Visually inspect railings, stair and other components for the main safety warning signs, loose connections or poor workmanship such as wobbly rails and posts; missing or weak connections such ledger boards nailed to building instead of through bolted; the corrosion on connectors and missing flashing to direct water away from critical areas; Wood rot or severe wood cracking, metal fatigue, rust and corrosion of critical structural components including the girders, beams, and surface decking, and also look for any unacceptable deflection or deformation such as sagging, bending or excessive bouncing.  Obtain the services of a qualified deck professional or Professional Engineer if there is any doubts.

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect the front porch roof on 1960's and 1970's colonials also can pull away from the house. Look down any and all straight edge and flat planes of walls, roofs, frieze boards, foundation walls, gables ends, gutter lines, etc. to detect and correct any deformity. 

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect the front porch foundation and any brick or block work. Water and the freeze/thaw cycles can cause the porch to shift, move or crack. Any brickwork will spall over time. Mortar is made to protect the brick and block and erodes out slowly.  To replace the mortar is called tuck-pointing. The mortar type, soft, medium, or hard must be matched with the existing type or brick damage and failure may follow. Water allowed to get between the house and the porch that freezes will push one side or the other apart.

deck maintenance = every 18 months or less refinish.

www.opwdedcks.com

Rubbol Dek

Nobel Sikkens Decorative Coatings,

Performacnce Coatings, (penofin stains)

Duckback

water lox

thompson water seal

 

6) Patios,  Driveways, Walkways

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect the surfaces for movement and damage.  Poor drainage can cause heaving , erosion, and spalling. Correct and redirect water away from these surfaces.  Prevent water from penetrating under by installing a drainage system, and caulking and flashing areas as needed. Concrete joints can be caulked. Large gaps or cracks can be filled with foam backer rod available at building supply and hardware stores to avoid excessive caulk usage and cracking.  Patching cement can be used on excessively large openings.   See Exterior section below for more information:

7) Misc.

Do first - structural - Initially - yearly - Visually inspect all other structural components and items such as trees, antennas, pergolas, etc. for potential structural issues

End of:  Do First - Structural 

(When in doubt, call in the professionals to do your maintenance check. Or call Jerry for an unbiased professional assessment 248.224.0258.  Condominium & cooperative association maintenance plan services and consultations available).    

At your inspection, your AwfullyPicky.com home inspector discloses and documents maintenance which requires your attention. Maintenance always costs time and money.  We feel you need to know about it when buying or selling a home.

Do first - Schedule - EXTERIOR (return to menu) (When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - EXTERIOR - Index: 

Please let me know what else to add to this list, Thank you, Jerry  at: AawfulPicky.com@comcast.net

AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994)

1) Safety

 

2) Driveways, Patios and Walkways

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally - Visually inspect driveways, patios, and walkways for deterioration and tripping hazards. Concrete and asphalt will eventually crack, heave, sink, and try to go back to their component parts, especially with the winter freeze / thaw cycle, water erosion, and summer expansion buckling. 

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -  

Do 1st. Schedule - 3a) Exterior - annually in spring - Asphalt driveways need surface re-coating every few years as small surface cracks begin to appear. Large and deep cracks need to be immediately patched before water and ice can cause further damage. The building material suppliers sell 5 gallon buckets of coal tar liquid for re-surface coating asphalt.  Note that walking on asphalt surfaces results in pedestrians bringing coal tars, indoors into the home, on the soles of their feet or shoes. The coal tars stain and discolor the floors and carpeting and is extremely difficult to remove. This is especially true during hot summer days. Household rule: No bare feet outdoors on asphalt, and no outdoor shoes worn indoors.  Install entry rugs and shoe trays. Good luck.

Do first - Exteriorl - Initially - seasonally -  

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally - Asphalt cold and hot patch as well as liquid crack sealants are available for cracked and sunken asphalt surfaces. Deep wide cracks or broken edges or surface pot holes need cold or hot patching. Small cracks need pour in liquid sealants, or grinding and cold or hot patching. 

Concrete patch or caulk can be used to fill cracks and joints in concrete surfaces. Deep joints will hold too much caulk and the caulk will internally crack apart. For these large gaps and joints, install foam backer rod, (sold as coil in the insulation department of building material suppliers such as Home Depot, Lowes, Universal Weather Stripping, or Specialty Sealants., also known as caulk saver foam.) down into the crack about 1/4 inch below the surface of the concrete. Then caulk the surface gap. The caulk should not stick to the backer rod, but will adhere to the two sides of the concrete to make a water proof joint. Swimming pool caulk is a superior caulk for this application as well a an elastromeric self-leveling caulk like Vulchem, Noreco or Sika-Flex. Professionals typically charge $3, (2007 price), per linear foot to perform this service.  

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Heaved or sunken concrete is unsightly.  Mud jacking, i.e. concrete leveling, companies can many times inject limestone slurry into and under the concrete slabs to lift it back into place. These companies typically charge $250 minimum charge or $2.50 per square foot,  (2007 price), which ever is more. Any problem caused by water erosion must solved or the concrete will move again; typically in the next five years.  Badly cracked or obstructed concrete may not be able to be jacked up. 

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Concrete movement that has created tripping hazards in walkways, driveways, porch stoops, and door thresholds.  Short of mud jacking,  (i.e. concrete leveling), or replacing the offending concrete,  Patching cement, asphalt patch and other materials may be used to fill or ramp up to the new height. Install an adhesion barrier such as thin cardboard between the ramping patch material and the upper surface.  This prevents the patch material from adhering to the higher surface, but allows the annual movements in the concrete to not break the patch loose. The patch stays adhered to the lower level concrete.  Heat can be applied to a high edge to help in chipping or grinding down an offensive edge, (always use proper tools and safety precautions).

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Spalled and pitted concrete both indoors and outdoors can be repaired and patched instead of completely replaced. The patch or surfacing material can be obtained from the local building material suppliers. Another source is U-Coat-It

Do 1st. Schedule - 3a) Exterior - as needed -

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Mold and mildew stains on concrete need to be killed and removed. Many products exist to do the job. Simple bleach, water and tri sodium phosphate, (TSP) can do the job. Always read the labels and instructions. Some chemicals are labeled TSP but aren't and are dangerous when mixed. Oxi Brand -2 is an algae and mold removal system that has a second step with Oxi Shield to further protects the surface long after using the UV rays of the sun 

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Oil stains on concrete and asphalt need grease removers that are readily available at many stores including retail automotive part suppliers. Asphalt surfaces may be damaged by too good of a grease remover, so be careful.

 

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Gutter downspouts discharge great quantities of water onto walkways, patios and drives.  Many times the water seeps into joints and cracks and erodes away the subsoil. Re-direct the water as best as possible. Re-sloping the gutters to discharge at the other end of the gutter may help solve some problems. Other times, burying a pipe to accept the downspout discharge and piping it into a storm drain or downhill will solve many problems. Some problems are difficult to resolve.  

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   City sidewalk cracking, heaving, and tripping hazards will ultimately and typically become the home owners direct expense.  Some city's will share the cost if the tree on the city easement has heaved the walkway slab, (these slabs are called flags).

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Painted concrete driveways are required in some subdivision. Painted concrete has to be re-painted every one to two years. You need a specific paint for concrete driveways so as not to have a slip and fall hazard. Note: for painted garage floors - follow the manufacturer's requirements and instructions to maintain a good looking and safe floor.

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Brick and stone paver walkways, patios and driveways need occasional adjustments or application of sharp sand or slag swept into the spacing between the pavers. Areas with sinking or heaving pavers need to be reset on a firmer substrate.  

EXTERIOR - (porches, stairs, railings, gates, and handrails):

Do 1st. Schedule - 3) Exterior - Initially - seasonally -

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Visually inspect porches, stairs, railings, gates and handrails for the safety warning signs such as rot, water leakage, loose connections or poor workmanship, wobbly rails, loose posts and newells, loose or damaged handrails and gates, spindles, missing, moved or weak connections such as header connections, shifting and sloping stair treads, splintering wood, pealing paint, etc. Check flashings, scuppers and other water processing means. Exposed wood decking freezes and ices over more often than exposed concrete patios and porches. Decks and porches even in height with the patio or other exit doors may become snow covered and freeze the doors in place.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - always -  

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   keep the barbecue far enough away from any siding or other combustibles. Vinyl siding will melt and bubble when too close to hot items. Paints likewise will blister.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - seasonally -

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Visually inspect doors windows and siding for safety and other warning signs such as rot, water leakage, loose connections or poor workmanship, wobbly rails,Initially - seasonally - e main safety warning signs, loose connections or poor workmanship such as wobbly rails and posts; missing or weak connections such ledger boards nailed to building instead of through bolted; the corrosion on connectors and missing corrosion prevention flashing to

 

EXTERIOR - windows, doors, siding and other surfaces):

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - seasonally -  

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -   Visually inspect porches, stairs, railings and handrails for the main safety warning signs, loose connections or poor workmanship such as wobbly rails and posts; missing or weak connections such ledger boards nailed to building instead of through bolted; the corrosion on connectors and missing corrosion prevention flashing to

EXTERIOR - fences and vegetation)

Do first - exterior - Initially - seasonally -  

End of Do 1st., Exterior 

(When in doubt, call in the professionals to do your maintenance check. Or call Jerry for an unbiased professional assessment 248.224.0258.  Condominum & cooperative association maintenance plan services and consultations available).    

At your inspection, your AwfullyPicky.com home inspector discloses and documents maintenance which requires your attention. Maintenance always costs time and money.  We feel you need to know about it when buying or selling a home.

Do first - Schedule - ROOFING   (return to menu)  (When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - ROOFING - Index    

4) ROOFING - For all homes, (including gutters):

Do first - roofing - always - "Safety first, safety always" - Never climb onto a dangerous roof: Many types of roof coverings should never be walked or climbed on. Check with the experts first. Wet, frozen, cold and hot asphalt roof shingles will break, crack, slip, tear or otherwise move and dump you off the roof. 

Do first - roofing - always - "Safety first, safety always" - Stand you ladder safely following the instructions on the ladder. Be certain that the gutters or other surfaces leaned against will not give out and cause injury or damage. Watch for over head wires and other hazards. The ladder should extend safely above the roof edge to allow you to hold on to it. Walk straight up the roof as opposed to walking the bottom edge where wood rot usually occurs. 

Do first - roofing - always - "Safety first, safety always" - Walk only the front plane of the roof, (the pretty road or lake side), to prevent stepping into an old roof vent hole that has not been properly closed. Better yet, look into the attic first to determine if any area of the roof structure is unsafe and will not support you.  I don't care how big the raccoon, rat, possum, etc. is on the roof, do not walk backwards. Do not step into the roof valleys or onto the roof ridges as they will be damaged. Don't touch an old chimney as it can fall over. Don't touch electrical cables and other wires may be electrified. Assume they are. Only touch with back of right hand, (most of your heart is on the left side of your chest). 

 

 

Do first - roofing - Initially - always - "Safety first, safety always" - Never step into water or moisture in the basement or crawlspace as you could be electrocuted. If  the conditions are thought unsafe, shut "off" the electricity to the property before entering.

 

End of: Do first - Roofing 

Do first - Schedule - PLUMBING? (When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - PLUMBING - Index    (return to menu)  When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

 

5) PLUMBING SECTION INDEX - For all homes, (including water distribution, water heating equipment, drain, waste, vent system, sump and perimeter drain system, and fuel distribution system.):

See #4 roofing for gutter system information) 

5.1 fuel systems, (natural and LP gas, fuel oil, etc.)

5.2 water supply system

5.3 waste water system

5.4 sump and perimeter drain tile system.  

5.5 other water related items.

5.1 Do first - fuel system plumbing safety - Initially - continually - Be alert for the rotten egg smell/odor added to natural gas and LP, (liquidfied petroleum),  The rotten egg smell, (mercaptan and other compounds) is added to these fuels to alert the home owners to gas/fuel leaks. Gas leaks can be explosive or may asphyxiate or sicken occupants. Continuous weak rotten egg smells/odor near gas piping, and attached appliances typically indicate a small leak that needs repair. A strong smell indicates a large and potentially dangerous and explosive leak.  Evacuate the home and call the utility company emergency number or 911. 

5.1 Do first - fuel system plumbing safety - Initially - seasonally - Walk beside the gas meter and regulator. Any major strong smell requires immediate action.  If a minor smell is found, return in five minutes to determine if it still exists, if so, return again in five minutes. If the odor remains a leakage problem exists and needs repair by a plumber. Although minor leaks can turn into major leaks and disaster, be aware that the utility company will shut down the gas system in the bitter cold of winter if a leak is found. The utility company personnel do not make repairs. You then have to get a plumber in before the home freezes.

5.1 Do first - fuel system plumbing safety - Initially - seasonally - If a new LP gas tank or piping is installed, or an old system, that is seldom used, is refueled, there is a chance that the rotted egg smell/odor will be absorbed into the metal tank and piping, or absorbed by new rust, and disappear by the end of the first week of operation. Occupants may not be aware of the existence of a major leak since the warning smell/odor is gone from the gas.

5.2 Do first - water supply plumbing - Initially - continually -Check for water leaks under sinks, lavatories, baths, showers, refrigerators, toilets, ice makers, water heaters, etc.  Small drips can cause major water damage. Wait for the toilet to refill and stop before you go out the door on vacation.  Any tiny bubble in the ceiling or wall paint below plumbing usually indicates water leakage and the start of damage. Many one time causes of such damage may have occurred, such as condensation from cold surfaces, spills from bathtubs and showers, spillage and over watering potted plants, filling or spilling pet water dishes, etc. However, any continually leaking plumbing can do extensive water damage and create dangerous mold within 48 hours. (Monitor likewise for roof leaks also).

5.2 Do first - water supply plumbing - Initially - continually - Check for water leaks and looseness in any faucets, toilets, etc. Significant volumes of water can be lost down the drains due to water leaks through worn stems, cartridges, washer and washer sets, drain stops, flush valves, etc. Listen for running water when the system should be silent.  Also, most water meters have a small red pin wheel whose face is usually shaped as an equilateral trapezoid, i.e. profile of a symmetric, double pointed diamond. The pin wheel spins fast under on normal water flow, but will vibrate back and forth to indicate that a small amount of water is trickling through the piping.  Leaks over time can turn into thousands of dollars in water usage on a monthly bill.

5.2 Do first - water supply plumbing - Initially - continually - Determine that the "hot" water supply valve at the sinks, tubs and lavatories is on the left side. This helps prevent someone by accident from scalding themselves thinking "cold" water is on the right.  Shower valves without temperature overrides must turn and pass through cold water supply before supplying hot water.  This helps prevent scalding when shutting off the valve. 

5.2 Do first - water supply plumbing - Initially - continually - 

5.2 Do first - water supply plumbing - Initially - continually - Maintain water heater water temperatures at or below 125 degrees Fahrenheit to prevent occupant scalding. Skin scalds in 3 seconds at 140 F. Lower the setting of the water heater to maintain a proper temperature.  The Federal government likes 115 degrees, water heater manufacturers like 125 degrees, and the building code likes 120 degrees.  Know that even if you maintain these recommended temperatures, scalding can still occur if a layer of super heater water is created in the water heater through usage cycling.  

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - Install water backflow prevention valves on all hose bibbs and the laundry tub  faucet that have treaded ends to accept a hose connection.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - test that all plumbing fixtures to be certain that the hot water comes from the left of the control and cold form the right side.  This helps prevent scalding. 140 F degree water scalds in 3 seconds. Set the temperature of the water heater to: Ed, the plumber, wants 110 degrees, but bacteria may grow. The maunfactures appear to want 125 degree tank temperature, the building code wants 120 degree water and the federal government has indicated 115 degrees.  

5.2 Do first - water supply plumbing - Initially - monthly - yearly - Follow the manufacturers maintanance instructions when installing a new water heater.  For an existing heater, previous owners are notorious for not following the manufacturers instructions for opening and testing the temperature pressure relief valve, (TPR), or using the hose/drain bibb. Do not open these valves unless you are ready to fix or replace them. These valves usually will leak once opened after years of non-use. 

5.2 Do first - water supply plumbing - Initially - yearly -  Close and re-open the main gate valves supplying water to both the house and the water heater.  Again, if these valves have not been operated in several years, their handles may be corroded and stuck.  The packing nut holding on the stem and handle of the gate valve will need to be backed off, ie. loosened slightly to allow loosening the handle and stem without breaking something.  Globe valves may rip their seals when operated after years of non-use. Test the other valves per the water heaters manufacturer's instructions. Usually monthly for the TPR and quarterly for the drain bibb.

 

All homes, (plumbing):

All homes, (water plumbing):

All homes, (natural gas plumbing):

5.3 Do first - waste water system - plumbing - Initially - continually - Determine that the dishwasher discharge hose/pipe loops up above and then comes downward to its connection with the drain/waste/sewer piping or garbage disposal under the kitchen sink, (usually a minimum of 20"+ above the finished floor). This helps prevent discharge water from contaminating the cleaned dishes in the washer with "dirty polluted" water from the garbage disposal or waste piping. The 7/8" diameter heat and detergent resistant hose is usually 6'-6" long and can usually be extended to a 10' to 12' total length, but minimize bends and keep the run as short as possible. Alternatively, an air gap on the counter top acts as a back flow preventer and starts to spit water when it is becoming clogged and needs cleaning.Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - Locate and know how to open and shut off the main natural gas valve to the gas meter. The quarter turn valve requires an adjustable wrench to turn the valve off. "Off" is when the "handle" is turned 90 degrees to the direction of the pipe length. "On" is when the handle is in line with the direction of the pipe's length. Note that this is the same way the other water and gas valves operate on your water heater, furnace, and also the dampers on the heating and cooling  ductwork. The main gas valve should be turned off in the event of a major leak that cannot be controlled in the home by other gas valves, such as a fire or catastrophic earthquake.

 

All homes, (plumbing):

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially for safety - Prevent access to any sump pump pit or other pits and wells on the property by locking the doors or securing lids and covers. Small children can fall into and drown. Ever notice the child warning on the side for pales? Same thing.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - test that all plumbing fixtures have adequate drainage. Have those with poor drainage snaked and video inspected. 

Do 1st. Schedule - Monthly or quarterly - pour 20 to 30 oz. of water down all floor drains and any unused pluming fixture so as to maintain the water in the traps that keep the sewer gas from entering the home.

Do 1st. Schedule - Yearly - visually inspect all the piping visible in the home for cracks, holes leaks, smell, looseness, etc.

Septic system homes, (plumbing):

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - have the septic system tested and pumped. Record the location of the septic tank access lid(s) and the location of the leach field. Never drive over the system with heavy vehicles or grow trees or bushes with shallow root system in the field. Get information on what can and cannot be put into the system.

Do 1st. Schedule - Yearly or as needed - dig down and open the septic tank. Don't fall in or stand down wind!  Dip the tank, (usually a 8 foot stick will work),  to determine the thickness of the slug built up at the bottom of the tank. If thicker than 6 to 12 inches deep, have a septic pump service pump out the tank and inspect the system.

Do 1st. Schedule - Bi-annually - walk the field area to see if any fluid from the system is coming to the surface. You should not smell any sewage from a properly operating system.

Well system homes, (plumbing):

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - have the water tested for lead, nitrate, coliform and any other known pollutant in the area. Record the location of any buried well system. 

 

 

City/community water system homes, (plumbing):

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially and yearly - Locate and test operate the gate or ball valves on each side of the water meter.  Close and reopen the valves, (Have a large adjustable wrench in hand to free any stuck handles and tighten packing for any leaks). Typically the water meter is in the basement or utility room, or may be under or inside a kitchen cabinet. It is under the trailer or structure of manufactured homes. Test any electrical clamp connections to the water piping for looseness by lightly trying to move the connections using an electrically insulated object to avoid the possibility of electrocution.  If the connections spark, call an electrician immediately; Your electrical system in emergency mode and needs immediate repair. Otherwise, tighten and monitor any loose connections.

 

City/community sewage system homes, (plumbing):

1) heating, 2) cooling, 3) electrical, 4) plumbing, 5) foundation, 6) structure, 7) interior, 8) exterior, 9) floors, 10) walls, 11) ceilings, 12) attic, 13) roof, 14) ventilation, 15) porches, 16) walkways, 17) decks & balconies, 18) driveway,

Swimming pools and hot tubs, (plumbing):

Do 1st. Schedule - Safety - do not store water treatment chemicals indoors unless allowed by the manufacturer.

Do 1st. Schedule - spring - inspect operation of locks and self closing gates and other safety features for pool and spa safety. Determine that all protective barriers cannot be breached by small children.

 

End of: Do first - Plumbing 

6) ELECTRICAL - For all homes, (electrical service, panels,  including smoke detectors)

- Safety first, safety always - Electrical systems are a major cause of house fires. 

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - ELECTRICAL - Index    (return to menu)  When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

 

Do first - electrical - always - "Safety first, safety always" - Never grab anything that may be electrified.  Assume it is and test it. If you believe it is safe, only then touch it with the back of your right hand, (your heart is on the left side of your chest). If you get electrocuted, at least the current made your arm flinch and pull your hand away. "Better poked than dead" 

Do first - electrical - always - "Safety first, safety always" - Never touch anything tied to earth like metal plumbing, washing machine, metal support post, or stand with your bare feet on concrete when operating an electrical item.

Do first - electrical - always - "Safety first, safety always" - Install ground fault circuit interrupter, (GFCI) outlets or circuit breakers to further protect occupants from electrocution. (Note - do not plug office equipment into a GFCI protected outlets and circuits as a nuisance shut-off may occur.  Office equipment is allowed to "leak" more electricity per government regulation and will cause these unexpected shut off of power.) 

equipment into a s ever touch anything tied to earth like metal plumbing, washing machine, metal support post, or stand with your bare feet on concrete when operating an electrical item.

 

grab anything that may be electrified.  Assume it is. Only touch it with the back of right hand, (most of your heart is on the left side of your chest) if you think it is safe to touch. 

 

Do 1st. Schedule:

Initially - monthly - Install and test all smoke detectors.  Label the installation date of each detector and replace any that are over ten years old as they are considered at the end of there service life. 

Annually -  Replace the old  back-up batteries annually in smoke, radon and carbon monoxide detectors as needed.

Initially - monthly - Test all ground fault circuit interrupter electrical outlets, (GFCI). 

If you do not have any ground fault circuit interrupters, (GFCI), it is highly recommended that you install them to protect occupants from electrocution at all electrical receptacles located within 6 feet of any water source, any outdoor receptacle and any receptacle in a garage or an unfinished basement. 

To test, push test button, (usually black in color or labeled "Test"). The (usually red or labeled "reset"), reset button should then pop out and the electrical outlet should have no electricity. Push the reset button in to reset and re-establish the power.  

In some homes, prior to 1999 the ground fault circuit interrupter, (GFCI), outlet may still be energized when the test button is pushed, but other electrical outlets connected downstream to the GFCI should be un-energized, until the GFCI is reset. Newer GFCI do not allow this wiring technique which was useful to protect and maintain power to deep freezers located in garages. 

Note that a  ground fault circuit interrupter, GFCI should shut off in emergency mode when only 4 mili-amperes is lost from the GFCI or any downstream wired receptacle. Sooooo..., do not plug office equipment into a GFCI protected outlet since office equipment such as computers, faxes, etc. are supposedly allowed to "leak" more electricity than other components pre government regulation.

Twice annually -  (at time of day light savings time change) switch on and off all the electrical service panel breaker/switches.  Do not allow any large motors to be on and operating when switching the breakers on and off as the power surge may damage the components. Switching the circuit breaakers and main breaker lessens the likelihood that corrosion will cause the breakers to freeze up and not open the circuit in the event of an electrical emergency.  Keep an operating flash light available to light you area.

For all homes, (electrical service panel, i.e. fuse or circuit breaker box):

Initially and always - Keep the area in front of the electrical service panel clear of stored items and accessible for emergency shut down of the entire home or individual circuits. Know how to disconnect the electrical service at the main disconnects either in the electrical panel or upstream between the panel and the electric meter. 

Initially and always - Safety - Never touch the electrical box if noise is emitting from it, such as crackling, hissing, buzzing, or smells of burning plastic. Call for emergency help. Never touch the box while standing in a water, wet, barefoot, or while touch the plumbing or laundry machines. Shut "off" the main current disconnects if liquid or heat is coming from one or more circuit breakers. 

Initially and always - Safety - When touching any electrical component other than a light switch or receptacle, always first approach to touch the item with the back of your right hand, (i.e. your heart is on the left). If your hair stands on end as your hand nears the electrical component such as the electrical service panel, (fuse or breaker box), do not touch the component or box and seek emergency service. (this is true of steel fences also). If you get shocked touching a component with the back of your hand, you muscles will contract and pull your arm away from the electrical source. If instead you grabbed the item, your contracting arm muscles will lock you onto the component and you may die from electrocution or be severely injured. Bystanders should not attempt to dislodge you as they too will be electrocuted. They need first to call 911, and then shut off the electricity prior to attempting to rescue you.

- Safety first, safety always -  

 

Do 1st. Schedule - Annually - visually inspect the electrical service components both indoors and outdoors. Are the outdoor equipment firmly attached to the home and/or to the grounding rod and cold water piping? Are any components damaged by vermin, UV light, physical damage, etc.? Any electrical arcing noise requires emergency action.

For all homes, (electrical outlets. i.e. lights and recepticals):

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - pre year 2000 homes - To prevent electrical shock on pre 2001 electric ranges and other major electrical appliances that operate on 240/120 or 240 volts , update the electrical outlet receptacle from the old, (unsafe) 3 prong outlet to a modern 4 prong outlet that has individual and separate ground and neutral wires.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - pre year 2000 homes - Install ground fault circuit interrupters, GFCI protected electrical outlets to all 120 volt outlets within 6 feet of a water source, exterior outlets and in unfinished basements and garages. Test monthly.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - Recessed light fixtures may not come within 3 inches of contact with insulation unless the recessed light fixture is "IC" rated.  The manufacturer labels the any "IC" fixture in the information label attached. Non-"IC" fixtures touching can cause house fires. Recessed lights that go on and off by themselves are over heating and repair is needed to assure no fire conditions.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - for fire safety, replace or move any light fixture that is within 18 inches of any space or shelf that provides storage, such as in a closet or beside or above shelves, etc. Combustible items cannot come within 18 inches of a bare light bulb or within 6 inches of a florescent light fixture.

Do 1st. Schedule - Annually - Test all lights.  Replace heavily used light bulbs with the new energy efficient florescent types unless dimming is need; Then replace dimmable light bulbs with haligen bulbs but never exceed the fixture's wattage rating or bulb type instructions, (many times indicated on the inside of the fixture. 

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - for fire safety - In pre-1987 homes, determine that any newer than 1987 high temperature light fixtures, (halogen, or multi lights over 60 watts each,  have at least 3 feet of the newer high temperature circuit wire running to and attached in the connection box to the light fixture wiring. The new wire jackets have the date of manufacture stamped in it. This newer wire is rated for 90 degrees centigrade use verses the 60 degrees for the older wire. Too much heat can make the old, lower temperature wire degrade and become a fire hazard.

 

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - for structural safety - Determine that drilled holes are not too close to the bottom or top edges of wood joists and rafters. No cuts are allowed in joists and rafters along the bottom edge in the middle third of the span. cuts cannot be deeper than 20% of the depth of the joist or rafter. Holes drilled through any visible wood floor joist or rafters for electrical wiring, plumbing, ductwork, etc. is at least 2 inches from the top or bottom edge.  Any hole closer than 2 inches may have weakened the support and therefore may need additional support or replacement. contact your local building department for local codeagae requirements.

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - for safety - Remove the trim cover on any recessed light fixture that is suspected to be covered over with insulation. The recessed light fixture must indicate "IC" in its information strip if insulation is within 3 inches or covers it. Replace any improper recessed light fixtures. Non-IC fixtures typically loose a lot of heat or air conditioned air to the attic and therefore are not energy efficient. 

End of: Do first - Electrical 

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - HEATING - Index    (return to menu) When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

 

7) HEATING - For all homes:

Do 1st. Schedule

Do 1st. Schedule - Always - Keep flammable/combustible items away from any heat source. In the case of electric baseboard heat, 6 inches and no electrical cords or fabrics are allowed to drape over or near the baseboard heater.

Do 1st. Schedule - Always -  Maintain all manuals and keep a maintenance log book, folder, or better yet, a binder to store information about repairs and maintenance. Have your repair and maintenance service professionals leave a record listing the work completed such as: annual oiling of the blower motor, cleaning and/or replacement of any dehumidifier media or grills, replacing any worn parts, etc. Save receipts, warranties, and any other information in the binder.

Initially and yearly - Have your Heating system maintained - Find a  licensed and qualified furnace, or boiler technician to safety check and clean the unit(s) initially. Have the furnace or boiler serviced every three years thereafter, and then yearly once the units are 15 years old or older. Fuel oil appliances such as furnaces and water heaters need annual inspection, cleaning and replacement of fuel orifices. 

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially - Monthly or yearly - Locate and inspect the condition of the  furnace/air conditioning filters. Replace or wash the furnace/air conditioning air filter as recommended by the manufacturer. Usually the cheap, less than a dollar filters are changed every month or two. Better filters may last slightly longer. The large pleated membrane filters, (that can clean down to the micron, which includes cigarette smoke), may last over a year. Electronic air cleaners (many times clean down to the half micron), usually need monthly or bi-monthly washing as directed by the manufacturer, usually in the dish washer, and the quarter inch thick aluminum pre-filter needs washing under a faucet or hose on the same schedule. Note HEPA filters that clean down to the 1/4 micron will trap viruses but are too resistant to air movement for most furnace air handlers.

Do 1st. Schedule - Yearly - early fall -  Fuel oil furnaces need yearly  inspection, cleaning and jet replacement. Follow the manufacturer's instruction manual. (You never want the unit to atomize the fuel into the home. It results in a thin coating of oil everywhere in the home!!!) 

- Safety first, safety always -  

 

End of: Do first - Heating 

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - AIR CONDITIONING - Index    (return to menu) When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

 

- Safety first, safety always -  

8) AIR CONDITIONING - For all homes:

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially and always - Protect  your air conditioning system from physical damage - Pet urine, lawn mowing  and weed whacker equipment all can damage and destroy the unit. Install protective fencing and other barriers to safeguard against damage.  the compressor/condenser should be clear of any cooling obstruction such as walls, decks, and  vegetation 

Do 1st. Schedule - Initially and ultimately yearly - Have your air conditioning system maintained -Find a qualified service technician check and clean the air conditioner initially. Have the air conditioner serviced every one to three years. Follow the manufacturer's instruction manual.  Maintain all manuals and keeping a maintenance log book/folder makes sense. Have the service professional leave a record listing the work completed such as: annual testing oiling of the blower motor, cleaning and/or replacement of any dehumidifier media or grills, testing and recharging the air conditioner coolants, replacing any worn parts, etc.  The exterior compressor/condenser needs cleaning when ever the coils get dirty or covered with pollen, dust, dirt, etc.

Do 1st. Schedule - Annually - at beginning of cooling season, (spring) - Test operate the air conditioner in the late spring at the beginning of the cooling season. If the electricity has been shut off to the outdoor compressor / condenser unit, turn on the electricity by switching on the circuit breaker in or beside the electrical service panel. Also turn on the electricity if shut off outdoors at the serviceman switch box.  this box should be attached to the exterior wall of the home within sight of the A/C unit. Open the box, ( the lid usually can be unlocked and slid down or flipped up).  The pull block or circuit breaker needs to be set "On". The manufacturer's instructions may require a length of time that the electricity needs to be on before the unit is turned on. The also require that the outdoor temperature is high enough to operate the unit safely. Usually temperature need to be at or above 65 degrees F for several hours.  

    If the manufacturer's temperature conditions are met, switch the thermostat to "cool" and the thermostat fan switch to "auto". Lower the temperature setting below the actual indoor temperature to start the system. After the A/C has been running for 10 minutes, take a cooking thermometer and measure the temperature of the air returning to the system, (usually at the furnace/air conditioner filter), and compare it against the air temperature of the cool air coming out of the A/C evaporator unit, (the unit attached to the furnace in a dual system, or by itself in a purely A/C system). A nearby air register can be used as a testing site.  The A/C evaporator coil should lower the incoming air temperature by 16 to 22 degrees F.  Anything less requires a service call, and very low temperature differences can indicate an expensive repair and possibly replacement is needed.

Do 1st. Schedule - Annually - at end of cooling season - To protect the air conditioner in the non-cooling seasons, shut off the electricity to the compressor unit outdoors. This prevents the system from being operated in too cold of weather which could destroy the compressor and/or require replacement of the entire system. Since January 2006, the federal government generally requires any A/C system with less than a SER 13 energy efficiency rating to be replaced. Older system replacement parts were discontinued by law and not available.  Older systems typically cannot be operated with outdoor temperatures be 65 degrees F. Newer systems can some times be operated down to 55F. Commercial units with heating coil protection  as well as heat pump units, all in good condition can be operated any time of year.

Do 1st. Schedule - Annually - at end of cooling season -  To protect the air conditioner compressor/condenser unit outdoors over the winter, do not cover the entire unit  in plastic or other non-vented bag or wrap. Trapped moisture freezes and can crack the piping and leak. Some home owners place a plywood board on top of the unit and weigh it down with bricks or stones. This lessens the amount of snow and moisture entering the metal housing over the seasons.

Do 1st. Schedule - Monthly or yearly - Replace or wash the furnace/air conditioning air filter as recommended by the manufacturer. Usually the cheap, less than a dollar filters are changed every month or two. Better filters may last slightly longer. The large pleated membrane filters may last over a year. Electronic air cleaners usually need monthly or bi-monthly washing usually in the dish washer, and the quarter inch thick aluminum pre-filter needs washing under a faucet or hose on the same schedule.

Please let me know what else to add to this list, Thank you, Jerry  at: AawfulPicky.com@comcast.net

AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994)

At your inspection, your AwfullyPicky.com home inspector discloses and documents maintenance which requires your attention. Maintenance always costs time and money.  We feel you need to know about it when buying or selling a home.

 

1) heating, 2) cooling, 3) electrical, 4) plumbing, 5) foundation, 6) structure, 7) interior, 8) exterior, 9) floors, 10) walls, 11) ceilings, 12) attic, 13) roof, 14) ventilation, 15) porches, 16) walkways, 17) decks & balconies, 18) driveway,

Please let me know what else to add to this list, Thank you, Jerry  at: AawfulPicky.com@comcast.net

AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994)

At your inspection, your AwfullyPicky.com home inspector discloses and documents maintenance which requires your attention. Maintenance always costs time and money.  We feel you need to know about it when buying or selling a home.

 

Please let me know what else to add to this list, Thank you, Jerry  at: AawfulPicky.com@comcast.net

AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994)

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - INTERIORS - Index    (return to menu)  When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

 

At your inspection, your AwfullyPicky.com home inspector discloses and documents maintenance which requires your attention. Maintenance always costs time and money.  We feel you need to know about it when buying or selling a home.

Do first - Interior - Safety - Initially - Determine that the building has proper fire stopping where visible. Feel or look behind any finished exterior basement wall at the wall ends and at the wall tops. A gap should not exist between the finished wall and the foundation wall. A gap indicates that the fire stopping is missing and is likely also to be missing where not observable, like behind the wall every 10 feet. A wall fire could therefore easily spread. 

Gaps around ducts and pipes must be sealed with approved material at floor and ceiling level penetrations. 

Any duct penetrating the garage walls from the dwelling must be constructed of #26 gage or thicker sheet metal or approved material and have no opening into the garage. The door from the dwelling into the garage must also be a 20 minute fire-rated door, or >1 3/8 solid wood door, or a solid or honeycomb core steel door.  No windows in the door.  No open +-+holes allowed in garage fire walls or fire ceiling. 

Do first - Interior - Safety - Initially - 

fire stopping where visible. Feel or look behind any finished exterior basement wall at the wall ends and at the wall tops. A gap should not exist between the finished wall and the foundation wall. A gap indicates that the fire stopping is missing and is likely also to be missing where not observable, like behind the wall every 10 feet. A wall fire could therefore easily spread. Gaps around ducts and pipes must be sealed with approved material at floor and ceiling level? penetrations.

Do first - Interior - Monitor - Initially - seasonally - 

Do first - Interior - Monitor - Initially - seasonally - 

Monitor all cracks in the walls, floors and ceilings. stress cracks are very common in any age of home.  They may open and close seasonally with the interior humidity. Large cracks over 1/8 of an inch wide should be professionally inspected as well as any crack where any part of the surfaces have moved an 1/8 of an inch.  

Patch any drywall or plaster cracks and sand smooth.  Over smaller cracks, apply a crack sealant spray or flexible vinyl patching over the crack area so that it hides any small seasonal movements.  Follow the manufacturer's instructions for final finish techniques. (Good Bye Cracks, etc) , (2007)

For larger cracks, use a special flexible wall tapes and apply a self-adhesive flexible finish compound or wall tape following the manufacturer's instructions. (Pro Mesh, Fiba Tape, etc.), (2008)

Mold removal:Siamons International Concrobium Mold Control, www.concroium.com

 

Please let me know what else to add to this list, Thank you, Jerry  at: AawfulPicky.com@comcast.net

AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994)

End of: Do first - Interiors 

 

- Safety first, safety always -  

Do first Schedule) - INSULATION and VENTILATION - Index    (return to menu)  When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

 

End of: Do first - Insulation and Ventilation

 

End of: Do first - Fireplaces 

 

 

 

Safety first, safety always 

Do first Schedule) - FIREPLACES - Index    (return to menu)  When in doubt, call in maintenance professionals, or call Jerry for an unbiased assessment 248.224.0258)

 

 

 

 

End of: Do first - Fireplaces 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please let me know what else to add to this list, Thank you, Jerry  at: AawfulPicky.com@comcast.net

AwfullyPicky.com Professional Home Inspection of Southeast Michigan, Jerry @ 248.224.0258, (since 1994)

At your inspection, your AwfullyPicky.com home inspector discloses and documents maintenance which requires your attention. Maintenance always costs time and money.  We feel you need to know about it when buying or selling a home.

Please let me know what else to add to this list, Thank you, Jerry 

Click here to return to: Top of Page or use Ctrl+Home 

Click here to return to: Maintenance Home Page 

Click here to: E-mail Comments, Etc., (Thank you)